Sivin & Miller, LLP Attorneys at Law
Call For A Free Initial Consultation
800-836-3152

Civil Rights Archives

How do I know I've been falsely imprisoned?

False imprisonment is a topic that includes more than just the police. A civilian can falsely imprison another civilian. False imprisonment occurs when one person is held against his or her will by someone else who does not have the legal authority to keep that person from moving freely. False imprisonment means that the person is being held against his or her will in New York, New York.

Facts about hate crimes that everyone should know

It doesn't matter your race, religion, sex or creed. Anyone can become the victim of hate crimes. However, just because you were victimized by a hate crime does not mean that you will automatically receive justice for the harm that was done for you. In fact, the vast majority of hate crimes go completely unnoticed and they're never reported. Here are a few sobering statistics about hate crimes that everyone should know:

Police misconduct under United States federal law

According to U.S. federal law, peace officers who violate the constitutional rights, privileges or immunities of U.S. residents can be held liable for the injuries that result from such violations. As such, a person who is unlawfully injured by a police officer due to the excessive or unlawful use of force may want to prove that his or her constitutional rights were violated. This would, in turn, increase the chances of the plaintiff receiving a monetary damage award.

What is my right to remain silent?

Every human being in the United States has the right to remain silent. The right to remain silent, also known as your "Miranda Rights," refers to your ability to refrain from speaking, and thereby refrain from unintentionally incriminating yourself when you're interacting with a police officer. Although you have this right, however, you may need to invoke your Miranda rights directly by stating, "I am exercising my right to remain silent."

What's the Architectural Barriers Act of 1968?

Numerous federal laws offer different civil rights to the American public. Some of these laws protect individuals with disabilities from suffering from discriminatory practices, and they also help these individuals have equal access to various public buildings and facilities. The Architectural Barriers Act of 1968 is one of these federal laws. It applies to government buildings and facilities that are leased, remodeled, constructed and/or designed through the use of various federal funds.

How are civil rights and civil liberties different?

The terms civil rights and civil liberties are often used interchangeably; however, they are two very different concepts. For example, civil rights are granted to individuals via the federal government, through case law and various civil rights laws. Civil liberties on the other hand are freedoms afforded to individuals by way of the constitution.

Police misconduct basics: What you should know

Police have the power and ability to enforce the law. However, they cannot use excessive force when carrying out their duties. Under the United States Constitution, police in New York and elsewhere are limited in their ability to exert force depending on the situation and context.

What is the history of the Civil Rights Bill of 1866?

The first civil rights bill -- the Civil Rights Bill of 1866 -- became law on April 9, 1966, when the House of Representatives overrode the veto of President Andrew Johnson. According to the language of the bill, "all persons born in the United States" were "declared to be citizens of the United States." It's important to note, however, that the bill did not provide citizenship to indigenous Americans.

Prisoner holding times and the right to receive a speedy trial

Every person accused of a crime will remain innocent until -- and only if -- he or she is proved to be guilty beyond reasonable doubt in court. However, when police arrest someone for allegedly committing a crime, the individual will temporarily lose the right to freedom.

How does the Fourth Amendment protect me?

The Fourth Amendment is all about search and seizure and personal privacy as it applies to criminal law. If a law enforcement officer violates the Fourth Amendment in order to obtain evidence that will be used against you in criminal court, for example, this evidence may be thrown out and cannot be used against you.

Contact Information

Sivin & Miller, LLP Attorneys at Law
20 Vesey Street, Suite 1400
New York, NY 10007

Toll Free: 800-836-3152
Phone: 646-561-9150
Fax: 212-406-9462
Map & Directions

Tell Us About Your Case

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy